Tomorrow’s leaders designing tomorrow’s ships

Monday, April 1, 2019

Originally Posted by Diana Sherbs, Monday, March 18, 2019

Written by Lt. Kevin Robinson

Coast Guard Academy cadets in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department test out their ship design in a water-testing tank at the Academy as part of their capstone project, Feb. 14, 2019.     Their capstone project is to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations.     U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

Coast Guard Academy cadets in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department test out their ship design in a water-testing tank at the Academy as part of their capstone project, Feb. 14, 2019.
Their capstone project is to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

The Coast Guard has the statutory responsibility for establishing, operating and maintaining the aids to navigation, which supports 2.3 billion tons of waterborne commerce along the U.S. Marine Transportation System.

To accomplish this, the Coast Guard relies upon a fleet of 31 inland river buoy tenders averaging 52 years old, which are becoming increasingly expensive to maintain and sustain operations along this vital economic highway.

Senior Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering cadets from the Coast Guard Academyare working in partnership with the Coast Guard Office of Ship Design to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations.

Leveraging new and innovative technologies the cadets are working to produce platform concepts that reduce operational costs, increase mission efficiency, enhance crew habitability and align with the latest emission and environmental standards. The NA&ME capstone project is the culmination of four years of study where cadets learn the fundamentals of naval architecture, applied marine engineering, ship structures and ship design.

Each year, the NA&ME cadets leverage their previous Coast Guard Academy courses to develop a platform to address current service concerns and/or commercial shipping interests.

In the fall semester, the cadets balance established mission need, conduct a market analysis, develop hull geometry, estimate weight and conduct a stability analysis as they drive towards a final design based upon their design philosophy and top level requirements of the platform.

Coast Guard Academy cadets in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department test out their ship design in a water-testing tank at the Academy as part of their capstone project, Feb. 14, 2019. Their capstone project is to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

Coast Guard Academy cadets in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department test out their ship design in a water-testing tank at the Academy as part of their capstone project, Feb. 14, 2019.
Their capstone project is to design a replacement Waterways Commerce Cutter to ensure these vital trade routes can be cost effectively maintained through future generations.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin

In the spring semester the design teams evaluate the effectiveness of their designs through model testing in the Academy’s towing tank, ensure proper stability is maintained through damaged scenarios and establish seakeeping and operability estimates to define how the vessel will respond in various sea conditions.

Coast Guard Academy First Class Cadets Hannah Waddell, Garrett Magill, Micah Larson, and Robert ‘Trip’ Jackson have been working on their capstone ship design project for months. Their ship design is named the Goldstar Member.

“This project was chosen because the inland river towboat fleet is aging,” said Waddell. “There are new emission requirements and stability requirements that many of the ships are struggling to meet. This design offers an alternative solution that will provide a new boat that meets or exceeds these new regulations.”

Completing the capstone project is the final hurdle the NA&ME cadets face before graduating and becoming the Coast Guard’s newest ensigns. They take with them the skills required to excel today and to lead the service through future challenges.

“This project has helped us knit together everything we have learned over the last four years,” said Waddell. “All of the small details that go into ship design really become evident and you gain a better appreciation and understanding for professional naval architects and the products you see every day. Knowing why everything is designed the way it is will be important in the coming year when we start our career in a service focused around the operation of ships.”

While the projects are academic in nature, the cadets’ fresh ideas and innovative spirit have already spurred insight for the Coast Guard’s Ship Design and Acquisition community. During a mid-design brief, cadets proposed an integrated hydraulic propulsion plant concept that would allow increased operational flexibility of these vessels. One senior officer is suggesting that this idea be considered in future design iterations of these vessels.

“I would love to see it become a reality someday,” said Waddell. “There is still a lot of work that would need to be completed before that would be a possibility but it would be great to see something we have put so much work into actually operating.”

 

Comments


  1. Kevin Coulombe D13 Fl 01-02 Edmonds, WA says:

    Hello,
    Great article and good to see the Academy preparing the next generation for such an important task. We need well trained leaders to provide the best guidance to obtain the best sea platforms money can buy in the near future.


Leave a Comment




We welcome your comments on postings at all Coast Guard sites/journals. These are sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard to provide a forum to talk about our work providing maritime safety, security and stewardship for the American people to secure the homeland, save lives and property, protect the environment, and promote economic prosperity.

The information provided is for public information only and is not a distress communication channel. People in an emergency and in need of Coast Guard assistance should use VHF-FM Channel 16 (156.8 MHz), dial 911, or call their nearest Coast Guard unit.

All comments submitted are moderated. The Coast Guard retains the discretion to determine which comments it will post and which it will not. We expect all contributors to be respectful. We will not post comments that contain personal attacks of any kind; refer to Coast Guard or other employees by name; contain offensive terms that target specific ethnic or racial groups, or contain vulgar language. We will also not post comments that are spam, are clearly off topic, or that promote services or products.

The U.S. Coast Guard disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from any comments posted on this page. This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

If you have specific questions regarding a U.S. Coast Guard program that involves details you do not wish to share publicly please contact the program point of contact listed at http://www.uscg.mil/global/mail/

The U.S. Coast Guard will not collect or retain Personally Identifiable Information unless you voluntarily provide it to us. To view the U.S. Coast Guards Privacy Policy, please visit: http://www.uscg.mil/global/disclaim.asp

Please note: Anonymous comments have been disabled for this journal. It is preferred that you use your real name when posting a comment. WE WILL POST THE NAME YOU ENTER WHEN YOU SUBMIT YOUR COMMENT. Also, you are welcome to use Open ID or other user technologies that may be available.